Lens Services

Lens Features
With Spectacle Lenses, there is a wide range of available features.  New technologies has brought us a range in lens power that is virtually unlimited.  However, not all available features are right for all of our patients.  As such, we provide you with a brief discussion of each of these features so when you visit our office you will have some ideas of what features might work best for you.  We will discuss a [Color Tinted Sunglasses] ll of these and how they fit your needs.

1

Fixed Tints
Lenses are often tinted for a variety of reasons.  Sometimes the color is  just accent to the already stylish frame. Other times the patient is super sensitive to bright light (Photophobia).  Migraine headaches or severe allergies are a few of the reasons for this. 

Tints can be a "solid" color, where the color is the same throughout the lens.  Tints can also be a gradient where the top of the lens is dark and the bottom of the lens is clear.  This is useful for those who are sensitive to overhead fluorescent light but when they are trying to read they want all the light they can get.   

1




Sunglasses
Sunglass Colors tend to range from a neutral gray, brown, green and variations of their combinations.  We offer any color or density you can imagine.  Mirror finishes are also available.


1




Children & Sunglasses
Dermatologists tell us that many skin cancers originate from excessive sun exposure.  For younger children, ultra-violet from the sun is even more damaging. This holds true for children's eyes as well as their skin.  We recommend sunglasses for children as well as a cap with a "bill" to protect their young eyes.

1


Polarized Sun Lenses
Polarizing sunglasses eliminates reflected glare from wet road surfaces, bumpers, windshields and water on the road, lakes and rivers.  This is particularly useful for drivers, boaters, fishermen, hunters and many other outdoor activities. 
Yellow Lenses and Hunters
Hunters tend to like yellow or orange lenses since they increase contrast during the daybreak hours or twilight hours. During those hours the sun is at its greatest angle with the earth and therefore light passes through a denser atmosphere.  As such, light is more bluish during those hours.  As this bluish light passes through a yellow lens, the blue wavelength is filtered out and only the remaining colors can go through. Since the blue light can't get through the lens,  blue objects appear to be darker or even black.  That increases contrast against all the other colors. 

Transitions &  Photogray
Transition and Photogray lenses change with the light.  Light from the sun contains ultra-violet wavelengths (over 700 nm).  It is the ultra-violet that creates a change in the chemistry of the lens.  This change causes the lens to darken.  Transition refers to plastic light weight lenses.  Photogray refers to glass lenses.  Both of these photosensitive lenses block over 95% of the ultra-violet rays.  When indoors, and out of the effect from sunlight, the lenses lighten up nearly perfectly clear.  When in your car, the lenses are only about 25% dark due to the fact that the car windshield blocks about 50% of the UV.  Transitions come in two densities.  If you prefer clear lenses when you are indoors, the traditional Transitions lens is best for you.  However, if you are sensitive to bright light and prefer a comfortable light tint indoors and you want moderate darkening in the car, then you should use Transitions XTRActive.

1

1

1




Hard Coat Finish
A hard coat finish is a coating of silica particles that are baked on the surface of the lenses.  This finish resists scratches and nicks.  This hard coat finish is baked on the front and the back surface of both lenses.  Over a period of time,  the hard coat finish will reduce scratches by approximately 75%. 

1

Anti-Reflective Coating
When you look at a high quality camera lens, you will note a purplish sheen to the surface of the lens.  This is an Anti-Reflection (ARC) Coating which is baked on the lens.  This same anti-reflection coating is available in your glasses.  This coating reduces reflections and glare from lights by over 80%.  This feature is particularly useful when driving at night, when there is a multitude of streetlights and car lights that are reflecting off the surfaces of your lenses.  Glare while driving or while on a computer can create a lot of visual discomfort.

Another cool feature of ARC is that it is "Hydrophobic".  This means that water beads up on a lens with ARC on it, and is easy to clean. The final feature of ARC is that it also has the hard coat finish built into it.  This gives your lenses the same hard finish as the Hard Coat listed above.

Registration Forms

Sign up here to learn more about us and our services.

Hours of Operation

*On Wednesdays, we are closed from 12pm -1pm

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Locations

Find us on the map

Featured Articles

Read up on informative topics

  • Frequently Asked Questions

    Why do I need to see an eye care provider? Many “silent” diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetes, can only be detected through regular eye exams. When these conditions are discovered earlier rather than later, they become easier to treat or manage, allowing for better long-term preservation of eyesight. ...

    Read More
  • Pediatric Ophthlamology

    Ophthalmology addresses the physiology, anatomy and diseases of the eyes. Pediatric ophthalmology focuses on the eyes of children. Pediatric ophthalmologists examine children’s eyes to see if they need corrective lenses or other treatments to improve their vision. Training for Pediatric Ophthalmologists Pediatric ...

    Read More
  • Allergies

    Caused by the same irritants as hay fever, runny nose, coughing, and sneezing, eye allergies commonly affect those who suffer from other allergy symptoms. Not only do eye allergies cause discomfort, but they can also interfere with daily activities. Eye Allergy Causes Medically referred to as allergic ...

    Read More
  • Learning-Related Vision Problems

    Learning disabilities may include dyslexia, math disorder, writing disorder, auditory processing deficits, or visual processing deficits. Although each child with a learning disability is unique, many also have associated visual problems. Addressing these vision disorders may alleviate some symptoms ...

    Read More
  • UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Optometry warnings about the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation on our eyes have not yet reached the degree of public awareness of that of skin damage. Yet, the sun can be just as damaging upon our eyes with unprotected exposure. Short-term exposure to very bright sunlight can result in a type ...

    Read More
  • How To Protect Your Eyes While Wearing Halloween-Themed Contact Lenses

    Spooky novelty contact lenses can make your Halloween costume even scarier, but are they safe? ...

    Read More
  • Fuchs' Corneal Dystrophy

    Fuchs' dystrophy (pronounced fooks DIS-truh-fee) is an eye disease characterized by degenerative changes to the cornea’s innermost layer of cells. The cause for Fuchs' dystrophy is not fully understood. If your mother or father has the disease, then there is roughly a 50 percent chance that you will ...

    Read More
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started ...

    Read More

Newsletter Signup

Sign up for more articles